Home |Coral Snake | Snakebite
Chronicle of Recovery from a Texas Coral Snake Bite

Day 2, November 30. Two days after being bitten by a Texas Coral Snake (Micrurus tener), they let me out of the hospital before lunch under the condition that I stay within 30 minutes of a major hospital in case I start having breathing difficulties. To that end, we spent the afternoon in San Antonio with an old friend from the Yucca Mountain days, then drove about an hour to Austin to convalesce at my sister's house for a few days.

When my arm was bandaged and tied up to my IV bag hanger, it became more and more uncomfortable as the night wore on. I took that to mean that there was swelling and the bandaging had become too tight, so I got permission from the doctors to loosen it a bit. That helped a little, but not much. Later, when I was being released, they took the bandages off, and I realized that the discomfort was not from too-tight bandages or swelling, it was due to burning and itching sensations running up both sides of my forearm (see photos), plus a swollen nodule about the size of a green pea under my skin on the inside of my forearm that was quite sore. The hand was quite stiff too, and I could barely make a fist.

Texas Coral Snake Bite
0:15 AM
Texas Coral Snake Bite
10:29 AM
Texas Coral Snake Bite
10:44 AM. Making a break for it
Texas Coral Snake Bite
10:44 AM. Goodbye University Hospital!
Texas Coral Snake Bite
Burning sensations running up the outside of my forearm
Texas Coral Snake Bite
Burning sensations running up the inside of my forearm plus nodule
Texas Coral Snake Bite
Stiff hand can't make a tight fist
Texas Coral Snake Bite
Stiff hand can't make a tight fist
Note: All distances, elevations, and other facts are approximate.
copyright; Last updated 101226

Coral Snake Bite Texas Coral Snake   Copyright, Conditions, Disclaimer Home