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Striped Meadowhawk (Sympetrum pallipes)
Invertebrates Around Las Vegas, Wildlife Around Las Vegas
Striped Meadowhawk (Sympetrum pallipes)

General: Striped Meadowhawks (Sympetrum pallipes) are active daytime fliers. Males are recognized by the red abdomen, brown head and thorax, and three pale thoracic stripes (this is the only meadowhawk with a top stripe). The face is white, the wings are clear, and stigma is bi-colored (darker in the center). The base of the wings is red, and there is a bit of black low on the sides of the abdomen. Females are similar, except yellow-orange where males are red.

These active creatures are harmless to humans, but they are voracious predators of small flying insects such as flies and mosquitoes. There are some good places for Watching Dragonflies Around Las Vegas.

Striped Meadowhawk (Sympetrum pallipes)

Taxonomy: Order Odonata, Suborder Epiprocta, Family Libellulidae.

Where to find: Striped Meadowhawks are common in some areas around Las Vegas. Look for them in the fall at Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge and over in Arizona in the Mojave Desert portion of Grand Canyon - Parashant National Monument.

Striped Meadowhawk (Sympetrum pallipes)
Male Striped Meadowhawk
Striped Meadowhawk (Sympetrum pallipes)
Female Striped Meadowhawk
Striped Meadowhawk (Sympetrum pallipes) Striped Meadowhawk (Sympetrum pallipes)
Striped Meadowhawk (Sympetrum pallipes) Striped Meadowhawk (Sympetrum pallipes)
Striped Meadowhawk (Sympetrum pallipes)
Striped Meadowhawk (Sympetrum pallipes) Striped Meadowhawk (Sympetrum pallipes)
Striped Meadowhawk (Sympetrum pallipes) Striped Meadowhawk (Sympetrum pallipes)
Striped Meadowhawk (Sympetrum pallipes) Striped Meadowhawk (Sympetrum pallipes)
Striped Meadowhawk (Sympetrum pallipes)
Male Striped Meadowhawk
Striped Meadowhawk (Sympetrum pallipes)
Male and female laying eggs in dry vegetation
Striped Meadowhawk (Sympetrum pallipes)
Male and female laying eggs in dry vegetation
Striped Meadowhawk (Sympetrum pallipes)
Male and female laying eggs in dry vegetation
Striped Meadowhawk (Sympetrum pallipes)
Female Striped Meadowhawk
Striped Meadowhawk (Sympetrum pallipes)
Female Striped Meadowhawk

Note: All distances, elevations, and other facts are approximate.
© 2014 Jim Boone; Last updated 111011

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